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Thursday, April 17, 2014

Mark 10 and the Kingdom of God....Part Two



Mark 10 and the Kingdom of God…[1]
“Then who can be saved?”
Part TWO


Matthew 19:27 (KJV)
27 Then answered Peter and said unto him, Behold, we have forsaken all, and followed thee;
what shall we have therefore? [2]

Mark 10:28-31
28  aPeter began to say to Him, “Behold, we have left everything and followed You.”
29  Jesus said, “Truly I say to you, athere is no one who has left house or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or farms, for My sake and for the gospel’s sake,
30  1but that he will receive a hundred times as much now in 2the present age, houses and brothers and sisters and mothers and children and farms, along with persecutions; and in athe age to come, eternal life.
31  “But amany who are first will be last, and the last, first.”[3]


This is where we ended last time; I’ve had my surgery (yea! A new left knee!) and now I can begin to walk the way Father has always intended me to walk, renewed in His way.  Here, on the eve before Pesach (Passover), this is a spiritual time for me and my family, one that I pray for the wisdom and strength to stay on course.  ‘Nuff said… we will resume our journey in the book of Mark, chapter 10, but first this rabbit trail…

                Since I mentioned Pesach (which has passed now, and we are onto the Feast of Unleavened Bread [Leviticus 23:6])[4], let me just take a minute to speak to some common objections that were recently  brought up by a Jewish brethren on a social site:

“…I received an inquiry from someone who is a devout Christian and was truly concerned for my soul. He expressed his beliefs to me and asked as to why I didn’t accept Jesus as the Passover lamb of which John the Baptist declared: “Behold the Lamb of God that takes away the sins of the world.”
I gave a brief response to answer his question and I thought it may be interesting to share this with some of you who are interested in comparative religious studies or simply curious as to why Jews don’t believe in Jesus.
It does baffle me as to why Christians assert that Jesus is an analogy of the Passover lamb as the Torah’s teachings concerning the Passover lamb directly undercut Christian theology. In brief Christian theology states that Jesus:
1.) “Was a lamb slain before the foundation of the world”- in other words, he was predestined to atone for humanity’s sins.
2.) Jesus as a sacrifice covers all sins and salvation is dependent upon the sinner confessing his sins and resultantly the confessing sinner will be redeemed.
There are some BIG problems here for Christian thought…
1.) The Passover lamb was not a sin offering and resultantly never atoned for any sins. Thus if Jesus is the Passover lamb then he cannot atone for sins as well. The true atonement sacrifices in the Torah were not lambs but were goats and bulls and the Torah also stipulates that they had to be a kid (calf) or a female…
* Leviticus 4:21: And he shall carry forth the bullock without the camp, and burn him as he burned the first bullock: is a sin offering for the congregation.
* Leviticus 4:23: “Or if his sin, wherein he hath sinned, come to his knowledge; he shall bring his offering, a kid of the goats, a male without blemish”
Only one time was a lamb mentioned as an atonement but it was NOT the Passover lamb and Jesus still does not qualify to represent this particular lamb neither…
Leviticus 4:32: And if he bring a lamb for a sin offering, he shall bring it a female without blemish. The key word here is “without.” The Christian Bible clearly says Jesus was whipped bloody, blood ran down his forehead from the Crown of Thorns, his beard was ripped out, etc. These alone would disqualify him, for he was NOT without blemish. Jesus was not a female neither thus he cannot qualify.
2.) The second point that Christian bring up is that Jesus is an atonement for all the sins of a confessing sinner. The problem here is that there aren’t any atonement offerings for intentional sin there are only offerings for unintentional sin (See Leviticus chapter 4). Therefore contrary to Christian claims, the sinner cannot actually be forgiven of all their sins.
In conclusion, it is clear that Jesus does not qualify as an atonement, the Passover lamb imagery is meaningless and the idea that any atonement can cover all the sins of the world is contrived outside of the Biblical narrative and is completely non-contextual.
Of course I must make mention that even the idea of human sacrifice is anathema in Judaism. All of the ancient pagan faiths around Israel were human-sacrificing cults but the children of Israel were commanded not to commit such abominations. Human sacrifice was prohibited by Judaism but later became accepted and necessary by Christianity…”[5]

So, let us address these things: My response will be in red type, and the poster’s original comment in blue

“…I received an inquiry from someone who is a devout Christian and was truly concerned for my soul. He expressed his beliefs to me and asked as to why I didn’t accept Jesus as the Passover lamb of which John the Baptist declared: “Behold the Lamb of God that takes away the sins of the world.”
I gave a brief response to answer his question and I thought it may be interesting to share this with some of you who are interested in comparative religious studies or simply curious as to why Jews don’t believe in Jesus.
It does baffle me as to why Christians assert that Jesus is an analogy of the Passover lamb as the Torah’s teachings concerning the Passover lamb directly undercut Christian theology. In brief Christian theology states that Jesus:
1.) “Was a lamb slain before the foundation of the world”- in other words, he was predestined to atone for humanity’s sins.
2.) Jesus as a sacrifice covers all sins and salvation is dependent upon the sinner confessing his sins and resultantly the confessing sinner will be redeemed.
There are some BIG problems here for Christian thought…”

First, it is a mistake for Christians to try to win a Jewish person over by the arguments based on Christian theology. There is simply too much baggage there.  It will not succeed, and will only cause a deeper rift.  So what do we do then?  We of the Hebraic Roots movement begin by trying to understand where our faith came from, and this is the faith of the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.  To understand our brethren, we must understand the faith.  It is not that because we are Messianic that we have a better knowledge of things; it is just that we have been able to get past all the objections and controversies and see both sides of the coin. To show Mashiach, especially to a Jewish brethren,  it has to be done from the Tanach and not the doctrines of religion.  Here though, is the problem both Jew and Christian face:  we hold to the teachings of men that tell us what to think rather than seek and decide for ourselves what the word of G-d says, in letting the Word speak for itself.  Anyone who says differently is one of two things: 1) intellectually dishonest, or, 2) someone who has truly begun to bow his/her knees in humility before G-d.  If I am letting the Talmud or the Targums or the Christian “fathers” or whatever tell me what is or is not, then I have not bowed my knees to G-d.  All I can trust is His word, not my own understanding (Proverbs 3:5) or the understanding of another.  So, in order to be what G-d has called us to be, each side must lose the air of superiority they each hold: none of us are without sin.  Whether or not you believe men are born in sin or not, doesn’t matter.  The “sin” problem shows up soon enough.  I do not care how pious you are, how devoted are your prayers, how many commandments you keep, how many good deeds you do – you are still short of the glory of G-d.  Why do I say this? Take the Sh’ma:

Sh'ma Yis'ra'eil Adonai Eloheinu Adonai echad.
Hear, Israel, the Lord is our God, the Lord is One.
Barukh sheim k'vod malkhuto l'olam va'ed.
Blessed be the Name of His glorious kingdom for ever and ever.
V'ahav'ta eit Adonai Elohekha b'khol l'vav'kha uv'khol naf'sh'kha uv'khol m'odekha.
And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might.
V'hayu had'varim ha'eileh asher anokhi m'tzav'kha hayom al l'vavekha.
And these words that I command you today shall be in your heart.
V'shinan'tam l'vanekha v'dibar'ta bam
And you shall teach them diligently to your children, and you shall speak of them
b'shiv't'kha b'veitekha uv'lekh't'kha vaderekh uv'shakh'b'kha uv'kumekha
when you sit at home, and when you walk along the way, and when you lie down and when you rise up.
Uk'shar'tam l'ot al yadekha v'hayu l'totafot bein einekha.
And you shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be for frontlets between your eyes.
Ukh'tav'tam al m'zuzot beitekha uvish'arekha.
And you shall write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.[6]
Just this first part of the Sh’ma none of us keep.  No one loves God every day with all his heart, mind, soul, body or resources. None of us speak of Him constantly; none teaches their children diligently at all times.  So we fail.  Jew or Gentile, we fail.  Of course, there is t’shuvah (repentance).  But still, we come short.  We argue instead of discuss, each side shouting aloud the merits of their case instead of listening and trying to understand.  Passion without discipline, that is what we do.  And many will find fault with this – yet if we are honest before G-d, we know it is true.

The writer of this post is correct: he speaks from his understanding of “Christian theology”, which in many ways has its flaws.  But so does Judaism when the words of rabbis mean more than the words of G-d. Every Jew and every Christian must ask themselves the following:

“What if the Bible (Scriptures) says one thing and my traditions say another?
Will I follow God or will I follow man?”

Take another look:  “…What if 1,000 prophets of the caliber of Elijah and Elisha tell you that the Torah means one thing, but 1,001 sages tell you it means something else? Whom do you follow? Maimonides, the most influential medieval Jewish scholar, is emphatic: “The final ruling is in accordance with the 1,001 sages.”[7] Yes, the Talmud even teaches that if Elijah himself differed with a rabbinic tradition or a prevailing custom of the people—not a biblical Law itself but simply a tradition or custom concerning that Law—then he should not be followed[8]…” [9]

Whom do you follow, my Jewish brethren, G-d or man?
The question is the same for my Christian brethren – whom do you follow, G-d or man?

Do we follow the teachings of the one we call our Master, Yeshua, or do we follow the teachings of men, men whom we have allowed to tell us what to think, how to worship, what our Bibles mean: men like Justin Martyr; Iranaeus; Clement; Theophilus; Tertullian; Origen; Martin Luther; John Calvin and on and on.  Yes -  the rabbis spoke good words, true words. The so called “Church fathers” sometimes spoke good words, true words.  Learn from truth, but these should not be our examples – for hate and lies also filled each mouth and heart.  Only G-d can be trusted.

So for our writer’s objection “…It does baffle me as to why Christians assert that Jesus is an analogy of the Passover lamb as the Torah’s teachings concerning the Passover lamb directly undercut Christian theology…” whose teachings does he believe are valid? Men who assert their own words above G-d’s? Or can he let go of tradition and see what G-d really had to say?

1              “Was a lamb slain before the foundation of the world”- in other words, he was predestined to atone for humanity’s sins.

Speaking of Yeshua, was he slain from before the foundation of the world? If this is true, we should be able to find Mashiach in the first word of the Hebrew Scriptures: בְּרֵאשִׁ֖ית H7225 be·re·Shit In the beginning.

·         The first two letters of b’reisheet  form the word bar (בְּרֵ); it can mean son or grain..
·         Add the third letter of b’reisheet and you get the word bara (בְּרֵא) which is the word “created” in Genesis 1:1
·         Take the letters (רֵאשִׁ֖י) and you have the meaning “my head”
·         Divide (בְּרֵאשִׁ֖ית) in half and you get the word: (שִׁ֖ית) translated into English as “thorns” in Isaiah 10:17
·         So what do we find in the first word of the Scriptures: “In the beginning/ the Son who created all things/on  my head/ a crown of thorns..” [10]

Discount it if you wish, but one word tells the Gospel story.

            Jesus as a sacrifice covers all sins and salvation is dependent upon the sinner confessing his sins and resultantly the confessing sinner will be redeemed.

Ummmm, not quite.  Yeshua became the sin offering once for all yes; it then is up to G-d through the working of His Spirit to awaken a dead man to life and to produce within him the desire to be free of his sins by repentance and turning back to G-d. Then he is follow the Mashiach and to live his life as outlined by the Torah of the new covenant of Jeremiah 31:33:
Jeremiah 31:31-40 (NASB95)
     31     aBehold, days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when I will make a bnew covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah,
32     not like the acovenant which I made with their fathers in the day I btook them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt, My ccovenant which they broke, although I was a husband to them,” declares the Lord.
33     But athis is the covenant which I will make with the house of Israel after those days,” declares the Lord, “bI will put My law within them and on their heart I will write it; and cI will be their God, and they shall be My people.
34     “They will anot teach again, each man his neighbor and each man his brother, saying, ‘Know the Lord,’ for they will all bknow Me, from the least of them to the greatest of them,” declares the Lord, “for I will cforgive their iniquity, and their dsin I will remember no more.”
35     Thus says the Lord, Who agives the sun for light by day And the 1fixed order of the moon and the stars for light by night, Who bstirs up the sea so that its waves roar; cThe Lord of hosts is His name:
36     aIf 1this fixed order departs From before Me,” declares the Lord, “Then the offspring of Israel also will bcease
From being a nation before Me 2forever.”
37     Thus says the Lord, “aIf the heavens above can be measured And the foundations of the earth searched out below, Then I will also bcast off all the offspring of Israel For all that they have done,” declares the Lord.
38     “Behold, days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when the acity will be rebuilt for the Lord from the bTower of Hananel to the cCorner Gate.
39     “The ameasuring line will go out farther straight ahead to the hill Gareb; then it will turn to Goah.
40     “And athe whole valley of the dead bodies and of the ashes, and all the fields as far as the brook bKidron, to the corner of the cHorse Gate toward the east, shall be dholy to the Lord; it will not be plucked up or overthrown anymore forever.” [11]

1.) The Passover lamb was not a sin offering and resultantly never atoned for any sins. Thus if Jesus is the Passover lamb then he cannot atone for sins as well. The true atonement sacrifices in the Torah were not lambs but were goats and bulls and the Torah also stipulates that they had to be a kid (calf) or a female…

That is correct as far as the sacrifice goes: but what was the Passover lamb for then? It was a Sacrifice. The Passover was a sacrifice. Modern theologians dispute this, both Jew and Gentile,  but it is a sacrifice nonetheless; an unusual sacrifice. In many respects, it differed from the later sacrifices of the Law, but in some aspects it was similar to what later became the sin offering, combined with the peace offering. It is very important to realize its sacrificial aspect.[12] Its blood made an atonement for the first born of Israel, the blood being a type of covering.

“…The proofs of its sacrificial characteristics are clear and abundant. The details of the selection of the lamb, "year old males without defect" (Exodus 12:5), the method of sprinkling the blood with hyssop (Exodus 12:22), and the disposal of the remains of the meal (Exodus 12:10), all testify to its sacrificial character; in fact, Moses himself says, "It is the Passover sacrifice to the Lord" (Exodus 12:27).

The purpose of this sacrifice was that the blood of the Passover lamb would be sprinkled on the doorposts and the lintels of the Jewish homes, so that the homes would be protected from the destroying angel. It is impossible for any theologian (or student of the Word) who takes the Scriptures seriously to come to any other conclusion. Exodus 12:13 says, "The blood will be a sign for you on the houses where you are; and when I see the blood, I will pass over you. No destructive plague will touch you when I strike Egypt…” [13]

The Passover is a sacrifice, a feast, a memorial, a prophecy.  Maybe there are eyes that do not want to see it as such, but it is all there if one can open their heart to see.  The Lamb of the Passover had to be male (Exodus 12:5); thus Yeshua qualified.  The atonement sacrifices came later, after the Exodus, so let us not confuse the Passover with them.  But what is atonement anyway? As I had iterated early, the blood on the lintels was a covering, a sign of G-d’s protection – the same act He performed for Adam and Chavah before He expelled them from the Garden. To do so, as stated in Genesis 3:21, a sacrifice was made, blood was spilled and a covering provided.  Thus, the first “Passover”. God provided a cover, which is how atonement is defined:
“…Original: כּפר
- Transliteration: Kaphar
- Phonetic: kaw-far'
- Definition:
1. to cover, purge, make an atonement, make reconciliation, cover over with pitch
a. (Qal) to coat or cover with pitch
b. (Piel)
1. to cover over, pacify, propitiate
2. to cover over, atone for sin, make atonement for
3. to cover over, atone for sin and persons by legal rites
c. (Pual)
1. to be covered over
2. to make atonement for
d. (Hithpael) to be covered
- Origin: a primitive root
- TWOT entry: 1023,1024,1025,1026
- Part(s) of speech: Verb
- Strong's: A primitive root; to cover (specifically with bitumen); figuratively to expiate or condone to placate or cancel: - appease make (an) atonement cleanse disannul forgive be merciful pacify pardon to pitch purge (away) put off (make) reconcile (-liation).
Total KJV Occurrences: 102
  appease, 1
 Gen_32:20  
  atonement, 71
 Exo_29:36; Exo_29:37; Exo_30:10(2); Exo_30:15; Exo_30:16; Exo_32:30; Lev_1:4; Lev_4:20; Lev_4:26; Lev_4:31; Lev_4:35; Lev_5:6; Lev_5:10; Lev_5:13; Lev_5:16; Lev_5:18; Lev_6:7; Lev_7:7; Lev_8:34; Lev_9:7(2); Lev_10:17; Lev_12:7; Lev_12:8; Lev_14:18; Lev_14:19; Lev_14:20; Lev_14:21; Lev_14:29; Lev_14:31; Lev_14:53; Lev_15:15; Lev_15:30; Lev_16:6; Lev_16:10; Lev_16:11; Lev_16:16; Lev_16:17(2); Lev_16:18; Lev_16:24; Lev_16:27; Lev_16:30; Lev_16:32; Lev_16:33(3); Lev_16:34; Lev_17:11(2); Lev_19:22; Lev_23:28; Num_6:11; Num_8:12; Num_8:19; Num_8:21; Num_15:25; Num_15:28(2); Num_16:46; Num_16:47; Num_25:13; Num_28:22; Num_28:30; Num_29:5; Num_31:50; 2Sa_21:3; 1Ch_6:49; 2Ch_29:24; Neh_10:33 …”[14]

Let’s look at some more objections:

* Leviticus 4:21: And he shall carry forth the bullock without the camp, and burn him as he burned the first bullock: is a sin offering for the congregation.
* Leviticus 4:23: “Or if his sin, wherein he hath sinned, come to his knowledge; he shall bring his offering, a kid of the goats, a male without blemish”
Only one time was a lamb mentioned as an atonement but it was NOT the Passover lamb and Jesus still does not qualify to represent this particular lamb neither…
Leviticus 4:32: And if he bring a lamb for a sin offering, he shall bring it a female without blemish. The key word here is “without.” The Christian Bible clearly says Jesus was whipped bloody, blood ran down his forehead from the Crown of Thorns, his beard was ripped out, etc. These alone would disqualify him, for he was NOT without blemish. Jesus was not a female neither thus he cannot qualify.

*Leviticus 4:21: this was an offering for the congregation… here is the context:
(Lev 4:13-15)
                “If the whole congregation of Israel goes astray, and if the sin is hidden from the eyes of the assembly, and if they will have gone astray from one of the Lord’s commands that should not be violated, then they will stand guilty. When the sin that they have committed becomes known, the entire congregation is to bring a young bull as a sin offering to the Tent of Meeting, where the elders of the community are to lay their hands on the head of the bull in the Lord’s presence and slaughter it. [Lit. the bull in the Lord’s presence] [15]

*Leviticus 4:23 deals with the sin of a ruler – doesn’t apply to Yeshua.
*Leviticus 4:32 deals with individual sin – again doesn’t apply to Yeshua.

As far as “without blemish” – the whole understanding on “spots, wrinkles and blemishes” needs to be gone over for us to get a clearer understanding of what these truly meant.  For what does G-d look upon?

1 Samuel 16:7 (NET)
16:7 But the Lord said to Samuel, “Don’t be impressed by13 his appearance or his height, for I have rejected him. God does not view things the way men do.14 People look on the outward appearance,15 but the Lord looks at the heart.”[16]

Spots, wrinkles and blemishes all have to do with the condition of our heart.  Remember in Part One I said it all stems from the hardness of the heart, all sin, all malice, all unforgiveness; G-d does not view the way man does.  He looks upon the heart.  G-d looked beyond the marring of Yeshua’s body and saw a heart unblemished, acceptable for sacrifice.

2.) The second point that Christian bring up is that Jesus is an atonement for all the sins of a confessing sinner. The problem here is that there aren’t any atonement offerings for intentional sin there are only offerings for unintentional sin (See Leviticus chapter 4). Therefore contrary to Christian claims, the sinner cannot actually be forgiven of all their sins.
In conclusion, it is clear that Jesus does not qualify as an atonement, the Passover lamb imagery is meaningless and the idea that any atonement can cover all the sins of the world is contrived outside of the Biblical narrative and is completely non-contextual.
Of course I must make mention that even the idea of human sacrifice is anathema in Judaism. All of the ancient pagan faiths around Israel were human-sacrificing cults but the children of Israel were commanded not to commit such abominations. Human sacrifice was prohibited by Judaism but later became accepted and necessary by Christianity…”[17]

I agree: intentional sins have no atonement for.  But… here is the grace and mercy of G-d.  Found in Exodus is this marvelous scene:

The Lord came down in a cloud, stood with him there, and proclaimed His name Yahweh. Then the Lord passed in front of him and proclaimed:
Yahweh—Yahweh is a compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger and rich in faithful love and truth, u maintaining faithful love to a thousand generations, forgiving wrongdoing, rebellion, and sin. v But He will not leave the guilty w unpunished, bringing the consequences of the fathers’ wrongdoing on the children and grandchildren to the third and fourth generation.
Moses immediately bowed down to the ground and worshiped.[18]

The bold text is a staggering encounter with the supernatural God. Moshe not only heard the words spoken by this physical manifestation, but consider this: he also saw them. Contained within this pronunciation of the Holy Name of God is what the Jewish sages call the “Thirteen Middot”; the thirteen “attributes” of God. Think about this, this wondrous encounter. In proclaiming His name, God was also establishing His sovereignty, and defining His mercy.

The Jewish Encyclopedia describes the “Middot” in this fashion:

“…MIDDOT, SHELOSH-‘ESREH: The thirteen forms of mercy, enumerated in Ex. xxxiv. 6–7, whereby God rules the world. According to the explanation of Maimonides (“Moreh Nebukim,” i. 52), which is confirmed by the Sifre (Deut. 49 [ed. Friedmann, p. 85]), these middot must not be regarded as qualities inherent in God, but merely as so many attributes of His activity, by which the divine governance appears to the human observer to be controlled.
In the Sifre, however, these attributes are not called “middot,” which may mean “quality” as well as “rule” and “measure” (comp.Ab.v. 10–15), but “derakim” (ways), since they are the ways of God which Moses prayed to know (Ex. xxxiii. 13), and which God, according to the traditional explanation of Ex. xxxiv. 6–7, proclaimed to him… The single attributes are contained in the verses as follows:
(1) “Adonai,” compassion before man sins; (2) “Adonai,” compassion after man has sinned (comp. R. H. 17b); (3) “El,” mighty in compassion to give all creatures according to their need; (4) “Rahum,” merciful, that mankind may not be distressed; (5) “Hanun,” gracious if “mankind is already in distress; (6) “Erek appayim,” slow to anger; (7) “Rab hesed,” plenteous in mercy; (8) “Emet,” truth; (9) “Nozer hesed la-alafim,” keeping mercy unto thousands (comp. the explanation of Samuel b. Meïr in “Da‘at Zekenim,” ad loc.); (10) “Nose ‘awon,” forgiving iniquity; (11) “Nose pesha‘,” forgiving transgression; (12) “Nose hata’ah,” forgiving sin; (13) “Wenakeh,” and pardoning…” [19]

It is from these thirteen attributes that a clear picture of what constitutes mercy and grace emerges.  It is too much to go into here, but by proclaiming His name in this fashion, even God makes a way for intentional sin to be converted for He takes no pleasure in the death of the wicked, and wants all to come to repentance.  You know, I do not know about anyone else, but I just won’t put G-d in a box and tell Him He cannot do something.  That is the hardness of man’s heart toward one another, to paint this type of picture of our G-d.  So unless G-d lies, the sinner can be forgiven.

Yeshua filled the role of the Pesach lamb; He filled the role of :

  • 1.)    The Burnt Offering : He gave all of Himself
  • 2.)    The Meal Offering:  He was without leaven, without si
  • 3.)    The Peace Offering: He made reconciliation possible between man and G-d
  • 4.)    The Sin Offering: The Price was paid for the transgressions of all
  • 5.)    The Trespass Offering:  He made atonement and forgiveness for our transgressions, our iniquities, and our sins


The First three are voluntary offerings.  As far as the idea of human sacrifice, Yeshua Himself said this:

John 10:11-18 (NASB95)
11     aI am the good shepherd; the good shepherd blays down His life for the sheep.
12     “He who is a hired hand, and not a ashepherd, who is not the owner of the sheep, sees the wolf coming, and leaves the sheep and flees, and the wolf snatches them and scatters them.
13     He flees because he is a hired hand and is not concerned about the sheep.
14     aI am the good shepherd, and bI know My own and My own know Me,
15     even as athe Father knows Me and I know the Father; and bI lay down My life for the sheep.
16     “I have aother sheep, which are not of this fold; I must bring them also, and they will hear My voice; and they will become bone flock with cone shepherd.
17     “For this reason the Father loves Me, because I alay down My life so that I may take it again.
18     aNo one has taken it away from Me, but I blay it down on My own initiative. I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again. cThis commandment I received from My Father.” [20]

He lay down His life for those who were and are lost.  Do we pronounce a policeman, a soldier, a fireman that put their lives on the line for those they do not know guilty of human sacrifice? Or do we recognize that love holds a higher esteem?  Are IDF soldiers an anathema to Judaism?  Are your security forces an anathema to Judaism?  Or does their love of their fellow man and their sense of duty transcend this narrow view?  No Christian, no true Christian or Jew for that matter, calls human sacrifice anything other than the abomination it is.  Is G-d anathema then?

Isaiah 53 (Tanakh)

53     “Who can believe what we have heard?
Upon whom has a-the arm of the Lord-a been revealed?
2For he has grown, by His favor, like a tree crown, Like a tree trunk out of arid ground. He had no form or beauty, that we should look at him: No charm, that we should find him pleasing.
3He was despised, b-shunned by men,-b A man of suffering, familiar with disease. c-As one who hid his face from us,-c
He was despised, we held him of no account.
4Yet it was our sickness that he was bearing, Our suffering that he endured. We accounted him plagued, Smitten and afflicted by God;
5But he was wounded because of our sins, Crushed because of our iniquities. He bore the chastisement that made us whole, And by his bruises we were healed.
6We all went astray like sheep, Each going his own way; And the Lord visited upon him The guilt of all of us.”
7He was maltreated, yet he was submissive, He did not open his mouth; Like a sheep being led to slaughter,
Like a ewe, dumb before those who shear her, He did not open his mouth.
8By oppressive judgment he was taken away, b-Who could describe his abode?-b For he was cut off from the land of the living Through the sin of my people, who deserved the punishment.
9And his grave was set among the wicked, d-And with the rich, in his death-d— Though he had done no injustice
And had spoken no falsehood.
10But the Lord chose to crush him b-by disease, That, if he made himself an offering for guilt,-b He might see offspringe and have long life, And that through him the Lord’s purpose might prosper.
11Out of his anguish he shall see it;f He shall enjoy it to the full through his devotion.g “My righteous servant makes the many righteous, It is their punishment that he bears;
12Assuredly, I will give him the many as his portion, He shall receive the multitude as his spoil. For he exposed himself to death And was numbered among the sinners, Whereas he bore the guilt of the many And made intercession for sinners.” [21]

No matter who you allude Isaiah 53 to, Mashiach or Israel, by your definition G-d is anathema because “…the Lord chose to crush him…”  Christianity and Messianics do not accept human sacrifice; but our sins required a debt to be paid.  This is the story of Pesach, the story of our release from the bondage of sin.  May we all humbly bow our heads.

I am positive I changed no minds, but the words had to be spoke.

Pardon me if I muse[22] for just a minute.  Do you ever wonder what it’s all about? I mean, I am just another in a long line of people that put their thoughts down on paper, and to what end?  I do not believe in “religion” as a system of beliefs, yet here I try to teach and inform about something that has “religion” written all over it.  So what do I hope to accomplish – what is the desired result I hope to achieve?  I mean, why even ask the question?

                My best guess to it all is simply this: that God can work through my short comings and find a way to reach out to you through the words He gives me.  I truly believe we are the “terminal” generation – that it is this generation that will see the greatest cosmic event of all time – the return of the Mashiach Yeshua and the establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth.  All history and creation groans for this event.  Whatever my part in this is, may YHVH grant me the wisdom, grace, mercy and the humility needed to fulfill it. My fervent prayer for you, dear beloved, is that may you seek Him while He can still be found…

On with our lesson:

Matthew 19:27 (KJV)
27 Then answered Peter and said unto him, Behold, we have forsaken all, and followed thee;
what shall we have therefore? [23]

                These are the defining questions of the Kingdom to come.
“Who then can be saved?”
and
“What shall we have therefore?”

                Let us unravel the first. 

Mark 10:26 And they G3588 G1161 were extremely G4057 overwhelmed G1605, saying G3004 to G4314 themselves G1438, And G2532 who G5100 is able G1410 to be delivered G4982? [24]

The word translated in the King James as “saved” is the word  “(G4982)…σώζω sṓzō; fut. sṓsō, aor. pass. esṓthēn, perf. pass. sésōsmai, from sṓs (n.f.), safe, delivered. To save, deliver, make whole, preserve safe from danger, loss, destruction…”[25]

It’s full definition is given below as pertaining to Mark 10:26:

(III) Specifically of salvation from eternal death, sin, and the punishment and misery consequent to sin. To save, and (by implication), to give eternal life. Especially of Christ as the Savior, followed by apó (575), with the gen. (Matt. 1:21; Acts 2:40; Rom. 5:9). Of the Lord, to bring someone safely into His kingdom (2 Tim. 4:18). Generally (Matt. 18:11, “For the Son of man is come to save that which was lost”; Rom. 11:14; 1 Cor. 1:21; 1 Tim. 4:16; Heb. 7:25; James 1:21).
 With ek (1537), out of or from death (thanátou, the gen. of thánatos [2288]; James 5:20). In the pass. (Matt. 10:22, “he . . . shall be saved”; 19:25; 24:13; Mark 10:26; 13:13; 16:16; Luke 8:12; 13:23; John 5:34; 10:9; Rom. 5:10; 1 Cor. 5:5; 1 Tim. 2:15). Hence as a part., hoi sōzómenoi, those being saved, those who have obtained salvation through Christ and are kept by Him (Acts 2:47; 1 Cor. 1:18; 2 Cor. 2:15; Rev. 21:24).
(IV) The basic meaning of the verb sṓzō is to rescue from peril, to protect, keep alive. Sṓzō involves the preservation of life, either physical or spiritual. Whenever the word sṓzō and its deriv. such as sōtēría (4991), salvation, sōtḗr (4990), savior, and the adj. sōtḗrion (4992), salvation, are used, the context must be considered to determine whether the preservation of physical life (deliverance from physical death, sickness or peril) or spiritual life (deliverance from sin, Satan and hell) is in view.
(V) Salvation of the soul is deliverance from death unto life through Christ (John 6:56; 14:20; Rom. 16:7, 11; 1 Cor. 1:30; 9:1, 2; 2 Cor. 5:17; Eph. 2:13) The believing sinner receives the spiritual life of a new nature from God (2 Pet. 1:4) and is freed from the power of sin (spiritual death) while having to endure its presence until the resurrection. Deliverance of the body will occur at the resurrection when an entire creation will also be renovated (Rom. 8:21–23).
To be saved means to be found. This is the reason why our Lord names tó apolōlós (neut. perf. part. of apóllumi [622], to lose), the lost one, as the object of His saving activity (Matt. 10:6; 15:24; 18:12–14; Luke 15:4, 6, 8, 24; 19:10). From the figures used, it appears that the Gr. apóllumi has in this connection the sense of to miss or be missing, not primarily the sense of destroy or be destroyed. In the parables of Luke 15:1–24, the lost are like sheep gone astray upon the mountains, like the coin slipped out of the hand of the owner and like the prodigal who has left the father’s home. A lost condition means estrangement from God, an absence of all the religious, spiritual, and moral relations man is designed to sustain toward his Maker. This lost condition is designated death, for it is the absence of true life (Matt. 8:22; Luke 20:38). The salvation of the lost, therefore, is salvation from spiritual death. [26]

“…Sṓzō occurs fifty–four times in the Gospels (not counting Luke 17:33 where zōogonḗsei [2225], to rescue from death, is a better attested reading than sṓsei of the TR; nor Matt. 18:11, omitted in some MSS). Of the instances where sṓzō is used, fourteen relate to deliverance from disease or demon possession (Matt. 9:21, 22; Mark 3:4; 5:23, 28, 34; 6:56; 10:52; Luke 6:9; 8:36, 48, 50; 17:19; 18:42; John 11:12); in twenty instances, the inference is to the rescue of physical life from some impending peril or instant death (Matt. 8:25; 14:30; 16:25; 27:40, 42, 49; Mark 8:35; 15:30, 31; Luke 9:24, 56; 23:35, 37, 39; John 12:27);
the remaining twenty times, the reference is to spiritual salvation (Matt. 1:21; 10:22; 19:25; 24:13, 22; Mark 8:35; 10:26; 13:13, 20; 16:16; Luke 7:50; 8:12; 9:24; 13:23; 18:26; 19:10; John 3:17; 5:34; 10:9; 12:47)…[27]

The subject remember was “eternal life”. This shows that the young ruler was at least a student of the Pharisees who believed in Olam Ha‑Ba, “the World to Come”. One article states:

“…The earliest source in which the phrase occurs is Enoch 71:15, which is dated by R.H. Charles (Charles, Apocrypha, 2 (1913), 164) between 105 and 64 B.C.E. A synonym frequently used in place of "the world to come" is atid lavo ("What is to come" or "the future") as in Tosefta Arakhin 2:7. Often also "the days of the Messiah" are contrasted with the life of this world. An example is the comment by the colleagues of Ben Zoma (1:5) on the phrase "all the days of thy life" (Deut. 16:3) that it includes in addition to this world the era of the Messiah.

Strictly speaking the period referred to by the phrase olam ha-ba or its equivalent atid lavo, between which and the present order of things comes the age of the Messiah (cf. Zev. 118b; Tosef. Ar. 2:7; also Ar. 13b), is the final order of things beginning with the general resurrection and the last judgment. According to the Palestinian amora R. Johanan, the golden age of the future pictured by the prophets concerned only the days of the Messiah. As for the world to come, it is said of it, "Eye hath not seen" (Isa. 64:3). His older contemporary, the Babylonian amora Samuel, however, held the view that the only difference between the present time and the Messianic era lay in the fact that Israel's current subjection to the rule of alien empires would cease. The new order of things would, therefore, according to him, first commence after the age of the Messiah was over (cf. Sanh. 99a; Ber. 34b).

A cardinal eschatological doctrine of rabbinic Judaism connected with the world to come was that of the restoration to life of the dead. It is listed as a dogma at the beginning of the tenth chapter of Sanhedrin. "Whoever says that the revivification of the dead is not proved from the Torah," so it is remarked there, "has no portion in the world to come."
 The matter was, according to Josephus (Wars, 2:8, 14 and Ant. 18:1, 4), one of the chief points of difference between the Pharisees and the Sadducees, the latter asserting that the soul died together with the body.
I *Maccabees, which records events down to the time of John Hyrcanus, whose reign began in the year 135 B.C.E., contains no allusion to it. The first definite historical reference to the Pharisees is that which speaks of the rift which took place between them and the aforementioned John Hyrcanus toward the end of his rule (Jos. Ant. 8:10). The Talmud (Kid. 66a) attributes the incident to his son Alexander Yannai. In the canonical Scriptures the first allusion to a return of the dead to life is made in Isaiah 26:19. However, the Sadducees contended (Sanh. 90b) that the statement "Thy dead shall live, my dead bodies shall stand up" might have referred to the dead whom Ezekiel (37:5ff.) had brought back to life in his vision, not to the general resurrection. An unequivocal reference to resurrection is contained in the last chapter of Daniel (7:2), where it is stated: "And many of those that sleep in the dust will wake, these to eternal life, and those to ignominy and eternal abhorrence…”[28]

So the matter of eternal life, while not universally accepted within the Jewish religious communities, was not unheard of, nor was it not hotly debated.  Thus Messiah Yeshua’s answer to the young ruler was profound. The Messianic Scriptures record this encounter thusly:

Mark 10:19 (ESV)
19 You know the commandments: x‘Do not murder, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and mother.’ ” [29]

Matthew 19:17 (NASB95)
     17     And He said to him, “Why are you asking Me about what is good? There is only One who is good; but aif you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.” [30]

Luke 18:20 (HCSB)
20 You know the commandments:
Do not commit adultery;
do not murder;
do not steal;
do not bear false witness;
honor your father and mother. t u [31]

Keep the commandments.  Yeshua mentions the latter half of the Ten D’varim (Words), those that pertain to relations between people. The Ten D’varim are the Ten Realities. Without them, none of the other 603 mentioned in Torah are possible.  The first four deal with how we approach a holy God.  The fifth, “honor thy father and thy mother” introduce us to the concept of כָּבֵד (kā·ḇēḏ): honor.  I have covered these in depth in a set of early epistles, but allow me to repeat a couple of pertinent sections:

“…What is reality? Have you ever tried to mich’tam [contemplate] what reality is? The vast majority of all human beings consider this time we spend from cradle to the grave as reality, but is it? Now before you think that I’m descending into some sort of philosophical quagmire, this is the point I’m trying to make: if you are reading this, then hopefully, you are open to the fact that there is a greater reality out there than just this in which we currently live. This life is temporal; that is, temporary. The greater reality is eternal, the realm of the spiritual.

To most, in the grand scheme of things, man has existed but for a pencil point on the timeline of history – at least that is the conventional wisdom, the collected wisdom of man steeped in its embrace of Darwinism and evolution. Call them what you will, Creationists see things a bit different, that mankind has been here almost since the beginning (minus about six days…).  One either believes God at His word or one does not, one either believes in the literal seven days of Creation or one does not. Mental gymnastics aside, what a person holds to in this arena defines their worldview; atheistic, mono-theistic, evolutionist, agnostic, creationist, believer or non-believer; the Word of God separates and defines the reality that one chooses to live in.  What religion one adheres to is also dependent upon on how one approaches the God of the Hebrew Scriptures;  does He exist or not? Thus the basis of all lives flow from and around the Hebrew Scriptures, independent of the world view one holds. Now before you say that is not really true, think carefully. Despite what you believe or do not believe, you have made a choice concerning the Scriptures of the Jews. 
Are you Hindu? You’ve chosen the pantheon of 4.5 million gods to choose from. 
Buddhist? You’ve elected the spiritual journey of “supreme enlightenment”. 
Muslim? “…Muslims believe that the verses of the Qur'an were revealed to Muhammad by God through the archangel Gabriel (Jibrīl) on many occasions between 610 CE until his death on June 8, 632 CE.[32] While Muhammad was alive, all of these revelations were written down by his companions (sahabah), although the prime method of transmission was orally through memorization[33]…”[34] (throw in some Hebrew Scriptures and mix…)[35] 
If you are atheist, agnostic, Urantian, Unitarian, Christian or Jewish – no matter what you profess, you’ve made a decision, a choice. Your world view hinges on a decision you have made concerning the Hebrew Scriptures.

So what conclusion can be drawn from this? The choice is stark, black versus white: either the Hebrew Scriptures are right, or they are wrong.  Where does one stand? To put it simply is this: either the Hebrew Scriptures are  “Truth eternal” or they are the ranting and ravings of crazy men in the deserts of the Middle East, full of legend and falsehoods. If true, then shouldn’t they be accepted as the Word of God?  If false, then go on your way, and live in peace with your decision.

 So where do you, dear reader, stand? It is an easy choice for me; I’m all in for this God of the Scriptures.  I’ll admit my bias upfront. The honest truth is, you have to suspend a critical mind, you have to shut down an intellectual pursuit of “Is it real or is it false?” and replace it with a blind, from-the-gut faith. One has to believe without sight, without absolute proof that God exists in order for God to become real to one’s self; He only shows up to those who abandon their disbelief and their “inquiring minds” for the existential reality of the Super-natural; take it on faith or go home.

Doesn’t one find it odd that all the ills of the world, the wars, the moral decays, the poverty, the greed, the ambitions, the decline of nations and civilizations all flow from whether or not a collection of writings by men some 3500 to 4000 years ago are actually the inspired Word of God or not? That from these words sprang a nation that continues to this day to be the lightning rod of not only world opinion, but also undying love or unquenchable hate. A relatively small group of people, who identify themselves as Jews, are on one hand the focus of a world gone mad, one that sees “Jews” under every rock, behind every ill, in control of all things, a force that has to be annihilated. On the other hand, they are the epicenter for the climatic and dramatic end of all things when their God [and according to my bias – The ONLY God] will return and recompense all their enemies for the evil that they have wrought upon them over the centuries, with a mighty army led by God’s own Son, slain before the foundation of the world in order that He might save it. Folks, you can’t make these things up. This is either Truth or it is not. Your take, your answer to this  is the reality that we live in, but it is not reality.

So what is? Well, from the last couple of paragraphs, one thing is certain. It all revolves around a collection of books called the Hebrew Scriptures; thus by deduction one can say this: the basics of life are in the Hebrew. For me, I can see no other conclusion one can come to. The sum of all things revolve around not only the Hebrew language, but the Hebrew people.  You can draw lines around the ancient civilizations, the Egyptians, the Chinese, or pick one of your own; all of them have disappeared, all have evolved, yet only one civilization has stood despite every effort by countless others to wipe it out: the Jewish people. Their book of Scriptures (called the Tanach), the TORAH rolls of parchment, their way of life, their identities; all of these have faced persecution and trials that no other civilization that came under similar circumstances survived and despite all the trials the Jews endure. Their books endure. The TORAH endures. They endure. There is a reality here that we causally overlook. There is more to this story than meets the eye; the eternal dominates their history, and it bears a closer look from those of us outside of it, for it might just figure into our own survival as well. 

This is the beginning point of understanding reality, the true reality. This is the reality that the heavens shout out in the splendor and the majesty of creation.  This is the reality that only intelligent design can explain. This is the reality that is a paradox; that all of history, the post that all of mankind’s dirty laundry hangs on, all his achievements and accomplishments, revolve around the Ten D’varim, ten words spoken to an ancient group of people from the twelve tribes of Israel and the multitude of strangers who left Egypt with them.  The cure for a sick world is found in these words, in this, the only reality that matters. 

They point to an answer, so we need to examine them, one by one…”[36]

Let us again at honor:

“…Exo 20:12 [The Hebrew Letter”hey” ה ] "Honor your father and mother, so that you may live long in the land which Adonai your God is giving you.

                    The Hebrew letter “hey” opens us up for the Fifth Reality.   The original pictograph was
  symbolizing a man standing with his arms raised out.   In later periods  סּwould come to represent the “hey”, or symbolize an open window.  It can also mean “breath” or “sigh” as if one has seen something spectacular. Either way its meaning was clear: it meant “to behold” or “what is revealed”.  “This letter is commonly used as a prefix to words to mean “the” as in “ha’arets” meaning “the land”. The use of this prefix is to reveal something of importance within the sentence.” [37]



                    Here in Exodus 20:12 we see the first commandment given by Yahvey that carries with it a promise. This verse carries such an important promise it is repeated throughout Scripture many times:

“Lev 19:3 |    ‘Every one of you shall reverence his mother and his father, and you shall keep My sabbaths; I am the LORD your God. 
Mt 15:4 |    “For God said, ‘HONOR YOUR FATHER AND MOTHER,’ and, ‘HE WHO SPEAKS EVIL OF FATHER OR MOTHER IS TO BE PUT TO DEATH.’ 
Mk 7:10 |    “For Moses said, ‘HONOR YOUR FATHER AND YOUR MOTHER’; and, ‘HE WHO SPEAKS EVIL OF FATHER OR MOTHER, IS TO BE PUT TO DEATH’; 
Lk 18:20 |    “You know the commandments, ‘DO NOT COMMIT ADULTERY, DO NOT MURDER, DO NOT STEAL, DO NOT BEAR FALSE WITNESS, HONOR YOUR FATHER AND MOTHER.’ ” 
Eph 6:2 |    HONOR YOUR FATHER AND MOTHER (which is the first commandment with a promise), 
Lev 19:3; Dt 5:16, 33, 6:2, 11:8, 9, 27:16; Je 35:18, 19; Mt 15:4, 19:19; Mk 7:10, 10:19; Lk 18:20, Eph 6:2,3” [38]

Let’s recap briefly what we learned from Reality Number Three, “…You are not to use lightly the name of Adonai your God…” :

“…When we take His name in vain, surely it only means misusing it right? O no my brethren; it is the act of us treating God’s name as if it carries no weight in this world.  It is the act of us showing Him contempt, of treating His Holy and Righteous Name as if it was a common thing. We Call Him God, we call Him Lord, yet these are titles; we use the Name of His only Begotten Son as a pejorative, we use it almost as a swear word, derogatory and depreciative to the point of blasphemy.  To His title that designates Him as the Supreme   Monarch of the Universe we tack on the “D” word and string His name with many other invectives.  We denigrate this Most High God in our words and deeds – and wonder why only trouble comes our way…” [39]

Notice the highlighted portion. Using God’s name in vain is treating it as it carries no weight.  Let us examine that weight now – it can be found in one word: כָּבֵד (kā·ḇēḏ): honor.  

Honor is seldom taught or understood in our culture today. Ironically, it is the very solution to some of our greatest hurts and needs.  God has said that if children learn to give honor to their parents, their life will be good (the same root word is used when God created and said or saw it was "good").  In Hebrew this is a powerful concept.
The root of this word as stated in the TWOT[40] “…with its derivatives occurs 376 times in the Hebrew Bible. It is especially prominent in Ps (sixty-four occurrences) and Isa (sixty-three), as well as Ex (thirty-three), Ezk (twenty-five) and prov (twenty-four). Of the total number of occurrences, 114 are verbal. The root is a common Semitic one, occurring in all except Aramaic where yāqār seems to take its place. The basic meaning is “to be heavy, weighty,” a meaning which is only rarely used literally, the figurative (e.g. “heavy with sin”) being more common. From this figurative usage it is an easy step to the concept of a “weighty” person in society, someone who is honorable, impressive, worthy of respect…[41]

The Hebrew word for honor " kā·ḇēḏ ", literally means heavy. To the modern reader this might not make sense, until we realize that in the ancient times, the Jews bought and sold by weight. Even their money, the shekel, was based on weight. How does this apply to us today?  We live in a world where relationships are often based on feelings. When we say that we love someone, we are usually talking about a feeling.

But the Biblical concept of love is based on the value of the object of our love.
The feeling may follow the value but honor is much more than a feeling.
Value changes your actions.

How does value change our actions? Great value changes everything.  This is a basic precept of God's Kingdom. The Bible says in Matthew 13:44 - 46 that...

Matthew 13:44-46 (NASB95)
44     aThe kingdom of heaven is like a treasure hidden in the field, which a man found and hid again; and from joy over it he goes and bsells all that he has and buys that field.
45     “Again, athe kingdom of heaven is like a merchant seeking fine pearls,
46     and upon finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it. [42]

Honor changes you. Honor transforms lives and relationships, not to mention cultures and communities. This concept of honor that can transform lives can be seen in the word pictographs of the Ancient Hebrew.  In modern Hebrew honor is written as כָבֵד; in the Paleo-Hebrew it is written as:

             
(from right to left the kaf or kaph, beyt, dalet).


Each letter represents something:
The kaf (or kaph): The Ancient form of this letter is like the open palm of a hand. The meanings of this letter are bend and curve from the shape of the palm as well as to tame or subdue as one who has been bent to another's will. [43]The beyt (or bet): The pictograph is chosen as it best represents the nomadic tents of the Hebrews… The meanings of this letter are house, tent, family as well as in, with, inside or within as the family resides within the house or tent.[44]·         The dalet: The basic meaning of the pictograph for the daylet is “door” but has several other meanings associated with it. It can mean “a back and forth movement” as one goes back and forth through the tent through the door. It can mean “dangle” as the tent door dangled down from a roof pole of the tent. It can also mean weak or poor as one who dangles the head down.[45]

What we see in the interpretation is this: the picture for honor is:
the hand opens
  
the inside
    
door

The inside door is the door of our heart. Honor is concrete and abstract at the same time. Concrete because of the actions we can perceive and measure that show value is being attached to ourselves. Abstract because it takes our mind and heart to process this worth that is being assigned. If you have ever been treated with honor, then you have experienced the weight, the heaviness of that honor, even if it but for a fleeting moment.  The Hebrew word picture for honor agrees with the Scriptures about the impact this value brings to our life. When we are valued, we open our heart and our soul…” [46]

Now it is not because I’ve run out of things to say or write that I repeat these things: some truths are so important they need repeating.  Yeshua’s citing of the last five realities hinges upon the understanding of the first four which leads to the Fifth Commandment.  Why did he not mention the first five then? Have you pondered the magnitude of His response – that maybe, just maybe, God places a high value on how we treat one another?  It goes without saying that we have to love God – but is a man pious and righteous before God if he has no regard for his fellow human beings?  Can you serve God with all your heart and despise your brethren?  Can we lift our hands in praise to God and lift our fists in anger at our neighbor?  The Kingdom of God isn’t just about loving God, but depends upon loving our brothers and sisters also – of hurting when the lost hurt, of weeping for the injustice we see.  The list goes on and on… 


Brethren, this study is too important to rush… we are at length again, so we will pick this up in our next post.  But consider your words, consider your actions:  Who can be saved?  What value do you place upon one another?  These are important points to consider, so till next time..

…May YHVH Elohim richly bless you my beloved…


[1]Authors note: Use of information from Jewish-themed websites should not be construed as these sites endorsing or confirming any thesis introduced by the author of this epistle. I present the information from their respective sites for instructional purposes only and/or to aid in the readers understanding of the subjects discussed.
[2]  The Holy Bible : King James Version. 1995 (electronic ed. of the 1769 edition of the 1611 Authorized Version.). Bellingham WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
a Matt 4:20–22
a Matt 6:33; 19:29; Luke 18:29f
1 Lit if not
2 Lit this time
a Matt 12:32
a Matt 19:30; 20:16; Luke 13:30
[3] New American Standard Bible: 1995 update. (1995). (Mk 10:28–31). LaHabra, CA: The Lockman Foundation.
[4] There are many controversies associated with the Jewish Calendar;
[6] http://www.jewfaq.org/prayer/shema.htm
[7] See Maimonides’ introduction to his commentary on the Mishnah.
[8] See again Maimonides’ introduction to his commentary on the Mishnah, and also the Babylonian Talmud, Yebamot 102a
[10] For further study see Pastor Mark Biltz, Blood Moons, ©2014 by Mark Biltz, published by WND Books®, Washington D.C. pgs. 27-29
a  Jer 31:31–34; Heb 8:8–12
b  Jer 32:40; 33:14; Ezek 37:26; Luke 22:20; 1 Cor 11:25; 2 Cor 3:6; Heb 8:8–12; 10:16, 17
a  Ex 19:5; 24:6–8; Deut 5:2, 3
b  Deut 1:31; Is 63:12
c  Jer 11:7, 8
a  Jer 32:40; Heb 10:16
b  Ps 40:8; 2 Cor 3:3
c  Jer 24:7; 30:22; 32:38
a  1 Thess 4:9; 1 John 2:27
b  Is 11:9; 54:13; Jer 24:7; Hab 2:14; John 6:45; 1 John 2:20
c  Jer 33:8; 50:20; Mic 7:18; Rom 11:27
d  Is 43:25; Heb 10:17
a  Gen 1:14–18; Deut 4:19; Ps 19:1–6; 136:7–9
1  Lit statutes
b  Is 51:15
c  Jer 10:16; 32:18; 50:34
a  Ps 89:36, 37; 148:6; Is 54:9, 10; Jer 33:20–26
1  Lit these statutes
b  Amos 9:8, 9
2  Lit all the days
a  Is 40:12; Jer 33:22
b  Jer 33:24–26; Rom 11:2–5, 26, 27
a  Jer 30:18; 31:4
b  Neh 3:1; 12:39; Zech 14:10
c  2 Kin 14:13; 2 Chr 26:9
a  Zech 2:1

a  Jer 7:32; 8:2
b  2 Sam 15:23; 2 Kin 23:6, 12; John 18:1
c  2 Kin 11:16; 2 Chr 23:15; Neh 3:28
d  Joel 3:17; Zech 14:20
[11]  New American Standard Bible : 1995 update. 1995. LaHabra, CA: The Lockman Foundation.
[13] …Ibid…
[14] F. Brown, S. Driver, C. Briggs; J. Strong; J.H. Thayer. Brown Driver Briggs Hebrew Lexicon, Thayer’s Greek Definitions, and the Strong’s King James Concordance. Electronic Edition, copyright 2000–2013, e-Sword by Rick Meyers, n.d.
[15] The Holy Bible: International Standard Version. Electronic Edition, © 2000–2013, e-Sword by Rick Meyers. The ISV Foundation, ©1996.
13 tn Heb “don’t look toward.”
14 tn Heb “for not that which the man sees.” The translation follows the LXX, which reads, “for not as man sees does God see.” The MT has suffered from homoioteleuton or homoioarcton. See P. K. McCarter, I Samuel (AB), 274.
15 tn Heb “to the eyes.”
[16]  Biblical Studies Press. (2006; 2006). The NET Bible First Edition; Bible. English. NET Bible.; The NET Bible. Biblical Studies Press.
Or The Lord; it is the personal name of God in Hebrew; “Yah” is the shortened form. Yahweh is used in places where the personal name of God is discussed (Ps 68:4) or in places of His self-identification (Is 42:8).
u 34:6 Nm 14:18; Neh 9:17; Ps 86:15; 103:8; 108:4; Jl 2:13; Rm 2:4
v 34:7 Ex 20:6; Ps 103:3; 130:4; Dn 9:9; 1Jn 1:9
The liability to be punished for a fault, a sin, an act, or an omission unless there is forgiveness or atonement; the term normally concerns an objective fact, not a subjective feeling.
w 34:7 Jos 24:19; Jb 10:14; Nah 1:3
[18] The Holy Bible: Holman Christian standard version. (2009). (Ex 34:5–8). Nashville: Holman Bible Publishers.
[19] The Jewish Encyclopedia, From the Article Middot, Shelosh-‘Esreh, pp 547, vol. 8 Copyright, 2002 by Varda Books COPYRIGHT, 1904, 1910, BY FUNK & WAGNALLS COMPANY All rights of translation reserved
a  Is 40:11; Ezek 34:11–16, 23; John 10:14; Heb 13:20; 1 Pet 5:4; Rev 7:17
b  John 10:15, 17, 18; 15:13; 1 John 3:16
a  John 10:2
a  John 10:11
b  John 10:27
a  Matt 11:27; Luke 10:22
b  John 10:11, 17, 18
a  Is 56:8
b  John 11:52; 17:20f; Eph 2:13–18; 1 Pet 2:25
c  Ezek 34:23; 37:24
a  John 10:11, 15, 18
a  Matt 26:53; John 2:19; 5:26
b  John 10:11, 15, 17
c  John 14:31; 15:10; Phil 2:8; Heb 5:8
[20]  New American Standard Bible : 1995 update. 1995. LaHabra, CA: The Lockman Foundation.
a-  I.e., the vindication which the arm of the Lord effects.
-a  I.e., the vindication which the arm of the Lord effects.
b-  Meaning of Heb. uncertain
-b  Meaning of Heb. uncertain
c-  I.e., as a leper; cf. Lev. 13.45 ff.
-c  I.e., as a leper; cf. Lev. 13.45 ff.
b-  Meaning of Heb. uncertain
-b  Meaning of Heb. uncertain
d-  Emendation yields “And his tomb with evildoers.”
-d  Emendation yields “And his tomb with evildoers.”
b-  Meaning of Heb. uncertain
-b  Meaning of Heb. uncertain
e  Emendation yields “His arm,” i.e., His vindication; cf. v. 1 with note.
f  I.e., the arm of the Lord; see preceding note.
g  For this sense of da˓ath see 11.2, 9.
[21]  Jewish Publication Society. (1997, c1985). Tanakh: The Holy Scriptures : A new translation of the Holy Scriptures according to the traditional Hebrew text. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society.

[22] Muse : to become absorbed in thought ; especially : to turn something over in the mind meditatively and often inconclusively..

[23]  The Holy Bible : King James Version. 1995 (electronic ed. of the 1769 edition of the 1611 Authorized Version.). Bellingham WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
[24] Charles Van der Pool. APOSTOLIC BIBLE© POLYGLOT. First Edition. The Apostolic Press, 2006. Text from the electronic version,  theWORD software ©2003-2012 by Costas Stergiou, version 4.0.0.1342.
[25]Zodhiates, S. (2000, c1992, c1993). The complete word study dictionary : New Testament (electronic ed.) (G4982). Chattanooga, TN: AMG Publishers.
[26]Zodhiates, S. (2000, c1992, c1993). The complete word study dictionary : New Testament (electronic ed.) (G4982). Chattanooga, TN: AMG Publishers.
[27]Zodhiates, S. (2000, c1992, c1993). The complete word study dictionary : New Testament (electronic ed.) (G4982). Chattanooga, TN: AMG Publishers.
x  Rom. 13:9; Cited from Ex. 20:12–16; Deut. 5:16–20; [Matt. 5:21, 27]
[29]  The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. 2001. Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.
a  Lev 18:5; Neh 9:29; Ezek 20:21
[30]  New American Standard Bible : 1995 update. 1995. LaHabra, CA: The Lockman Foundation.
t  18:20 Ex 20:12–16; Dt 5:16–20
u  18:20 Ex 20:12–16; Dt 5:16–20
[31]  The Holy Bible : Holman Christian standard version. 2009. Nashville: Holman Bible Publishers.
[32] Esposito, John L. (2000-04-06). The Oxford History of Islam. Oxford University Press. pp. 76–77.
[33] Al Faruqi; Lois Ibsen (1987). "The Cantillation of the Qur'an".Asian Music (Autumn – Winter 1987): 3–4.
[35] This is not to denigrate the Qur'an; even their scholars will admit that their holy book uses “…Adam, Noah, Abraham, Ismail, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, Aaron, Lot, David, Solomon, Elias, Elisha, Hood, Thul-Kifi, Enoch, Jonah, Job Shu’aib, Saalih, Ezra, Zachariyyah, John, Jesus..” as sources [see http://d1.islamhouse.com/data/en/ih_books/single/en_Who_Wrote_The_Quran.pdf, pg 2].
[36] From the epistle “…Trayvon, George and the Ten Realities… Part One…” by David Robinson. See at : http://davidseedofabraham.blogspot.com/2013/07/trayvon-george-and-ten-realities-part.html
[37] Jeff A Benner, Ancient Hebrew Lexicon of the Bible, Hebrew Letters, Words and Roots Defined Within Their Ancient Cultural Context, ©2005 Jeff A. Benner, electronic edition, theWord, © 2003-2012 - Costas Stergiou Version 4.0.0.1342
[38] From Passage Guide, Ex 20:12, Logos Bible Software 5.1 SR-1 (51.0.0950) Copyright ©2000-2012 Logos Bible Software
[39] From the epistle “…Trayvon, George and the Ten Realities… Part One…” by David Robinson. See at : http://davidseedofabraham.blogspot.com/2013/07/trayvon-george-and-ten-realities-part.html
[40] Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament
[41] Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament R. Laird Harris, Gleason L. Archer, Jr., Bruce K. Waltke; MOODY PUBLISHERS CHICAGO © 1980 by The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. Electronic Module by Costas Stergiou (root@theword.gr) for the Word Software. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles or reviews.
a  Matt 13:24
b  Matt 13:46
a  Matt 13:24
[42]  New American Standard Bible : 1995 Update. LaHabra, CA: The Lockman Foundation, 1995.
[43]  Jeff A Benner, Ancient Hebrew Lexicon of the Bible, Hebrew Letters, Words and Roots Defined Within Their Ancient Cultural Context, ©2005 Jeff A. Benner, electronic edition, theWord, © 2003-2012 - Costas Stergiou Version 4.0.0.1342
[44] Ibid…
[45] Ibid…
[46] From the epistle “…Trayvon, George and the Ten Realities… Part Two…” by David Robinson. See at :